Georgios Tsigaras

POSITION: Assistant Professor

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Telephone: 25310 39468

Email: georgts@otenet.gr

RESEARCH AND TEACHING SUBJECT:

Byzantine and Post-Byzantine art

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Byzantine and post-Byzantine painting (Mount Athos, Thrace and Central Europe), theory of Byzantine art.

COURSES TAUGHT

For further details, click here for course catalogue in English.

1. History of Byzantine Art (55EE5)

2. Post-Byzantine Painting (55ΕΕ4)

3. The Byzantine Pictorial Tradition and Modern Greek Art (55ΕΕ6)

4. Painting on Mount Athos (55ΕΕ7)

CURRICULUM VITAE

For full cv in Greek, click here.

George Tsigaras was born in 1959 in Patras, where he completed his schooling.

He studied Theology in Thessaloniki (1977-1981) and Byzantine Studies in Vienna (1983-1991). During his main studies, at the Institute of Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies, he attended courses on the History of Byzantine Art, History of Medieval Western Art, Modern Greek History and Literature and History of Orthodox Theology classes. In 1998 he was awarded a Doctorate in Theology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and in 2005 a Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Vienna.

During July and August of 1984, he worked in the library of manuscripts and art gallery in the St. Catherine’s Monastery on Mount Sinai. He also helped organize the archive of Metropolitan Chrysostomos of Smyrna (1984 – 1986).

He has done research on and catalogued the icons and relics of the Greek Orthodox community of St. George in Vienna (1985-1990).

He has published research on the icons and sacred vessels of the Ecclesiastical Museum of the Metropolis of Lemnos.

Since 2001 he has been member of the editorial board of the journal Peri Thrakis.

Since 2011 he has been teaching as Assistant Professor of History of Byzantine and post-Byzantine Art in the Department of History and Ethnology, Democritus University of Thrace.

His research interest focuses on the study of Byzantine and post-Byzantine painting (Mount Athos, Thrace and Central Europe) and the theory of Byzantine art.